standard Live Updates to Stephen Elop’s AMA

OpenLetter-featStephen Elop is currently answering questions sent in to him by readers and Nokia fans over on the conversation blog; but here’s a quick summary of what’s been said so far as well as updates to what’s going on (rooting out all the pointless questions).

 

 

Ali April 28, 20141:51 pm

The AMA is now officially over

Ali April 28, 20141:47 pm

A very important question to real social fans, regarding the future of Nokia Connects and Conversations:

Comment From JADE BRYAN JARDINICO
Hi Stephen, as a blogger and long-time time Nokia fan, Nokia Connects (WOMWorld) have been helpful, appreciative to us in many ways particularly in providing review products and services of Nokia. Unlike Nokia Connects, Microsoft Social team is aloof and uncaring. I would to like know the future of Nokia Connects and Nokia Conversations because both are important to us especially to the fans, evangelists. Thanks.

Stephen Elop: Today we are part of Microsoft, and Conversations is with us (actually, sitting right next to me!). And this will continue. I strongly believe in an open and transparent dialogue, and am proud that the team made Nokia Conversations one of the most influential company and technology blogs in the world.

Ali April 28, 20141:47 pm

A very important question to real social fans, regarding the future of Nokia Connects and Conversations:

Comment From JADE BRYAN JARDINICO
Hi Stephen, as a blogger and long-time time Nokia fan, Nokia Connects (WOMWorld) have been helpful, appreciative to us in many ways particularly in providing review products and services of Nokia. Unlike Nokia Connects, Microsoft Social team is aloof and uncaring. I would to like know the future of Nokia Connects and Nokia Conversations because both are important to us especially to the fans, evangelists. Thanks.

Stephen Elop: Today we are part of Microsoft, and Conversations is with us (actually, sitting right next to me!). And this will continue. I strongly believe in an open and transparent dialogue, and am proud that the team made Nokia Conversations one of the most influential company and technology blogs in the world.

Ali April 28, 20141:43 pm

An inevitable question about Nokia android:

Comment From Czech Republic
Hi Stephen, do you think that Nokia with Android is a good idea?

Stephen Elop: When we made the decision to focus on Windows Phone back in 2011, we were very concerned that a decision to pursue Android would put us on a collision course with Samsung, who already had established a head of steam around Android. That was the right decision, as we have seen virtually all other OEMs from those days pushed to the side. Today, we are using AOSP to attack a specific market opportunity, but we are being thoughtful to do it in a way that accrues benefit to Microsoft and to Lumia.

Ali April 28, 20141:42 pm

Worry not programs such as Nokia DVLUP/Ambassador’s will most probably live one

Comment From Petur
Will the Nokia Developer Ambassadors and DVLUP be shutting down or being absorbed into something not recognizable or less accessible? They have helped many devs become successful, including me, and I’m concerned that the program will be closed down.

Stephen Elop: I think we at Nokia have done a good job at involving developers around the world, and this is clearly something we want to continue. Our goal is to continue to have great participation and accessibility. We need the best app’s around the world.

Ali April 28, 20141:40 pm

A question about Nokia’s global approach Vs. Microsoft’s very centric US based approach:

Comment From gimmegimee
One of Nokia’s strengths is its truly global presence, moreso in emerging markets. I believe it responds faster than Microsoft in this regard. Can we expect better localization in these markets in terms of services?

Stephen Elop: Both Nokia and Microsoft are global companies, but it turns out that our strengths are complementary. We have great strength in emerging markets while Microsoft has more strength in developed markets. I think this will work well together.

Ali April 28, 20141:38 pm

And here’s a picture of Stephen answering the questions:

Ali April 28, 20141:35 pm

More questions about being dubbed a “Trojan Horse” and a very good repsonse in my opinion:

Comment From vivi
Hi Stephen, you have bashed very harshly with your efforts to take Nokia to Microsoft, have been awarded as Trojan in online discussions and comments. Do you take any effect of all this on your work/decision?

Stephen Elop: As a result of the work that we have done, we have transformed Nokia into a stronger company with NSN, HERE and Advanced Technologies. At the same time, our Devices and Services business has a new opportunity within a stronger Microsoft. As for the Trojan horse thing, i have only ever worked on behalf of and for the benefit of Nokia shareholders while at Nokia. Additionally, all fundamental business and strategy decisions were made with the support and approval of the Nokia board of directors, of which I was a member.

Ali April 28, 20141:34 pm

Another interesting question personally asking Elop if he gave “all he could” as CEO of Nokia, and if he has any regrets.

Comment From Peik
Thanks for the AMA. Selling Nokia rendered you well, do you feel you gave your everything as the CEO? Any regrets?

Stephen Elop: During a speech I gave today to the gathered employees of Nokia, errr, Microsoft, I said that the last few years had been both the most challenging and rewarding of my career. Like virtually everyone at Nokia, we worked harder and committed more of ourselves to this mission than anything before. Now, we have the opportunity to take it to the next level within the context of MSFT.

Ali April 28, 20141:32 pm

First off starting with the most pressing question was one posed attacking Elop in terms of what he did to Nokia/Meego and the N9:

Comment From frederick
You’re so cool killed Nokia …Thanks to you, Meego, Symbian, Meltemi buried …Once you get it all comes back to haunt

Stephen Elop: Thanks, I know that there is a lot of emotion around some of the hard decisions that we had to make. Back in late 2010 and 2011, we carefully assessed the state of the internal Nokia operating system efforts. Unfortunately, we could not see a way that Symbian could be brought to a competitive level with, for example, the iPhone that had shipped THREE years earlier! And the Meego effort was significantly delayed and did not have the promise of a broad enough portfolio soon enough. We had to make a forceful decision to give Nokia the chance to compete again.

  • efektos

    Soooo… I’m the first one to comment? :)

  • snoflake

    OT: Good luck with new site. And let’s leave Stephen to count his payout and report in to Satya